Local Anesthetic Techniques – Dr. Malamed

Dentures Using 3D Printers

Developed jointly by the Brooklyn 3D printing startup and Valplast, a dental materials manufacturer, r.Pod® Desktop 3D Printer claims to be the only 3D printer optimized and approved for printing Valplast®, the leading brand of flexible nylon resin for partial dentures and appliances.

“The ability to create end-use parts is the most exciting feature of the r.Pod® printer. In the past dental thermoplastics had to be either injection molded or vacuum formed, but the possibility to now 3D print them opens up a whole new world of CAD/CAM materials that didn’t exist before. This is particularly interesting for those who work with digital impressions because now there is now a completely digital workflow for restorations like Valplast® that in the past required physical impressions and traditional fabrication techniques.” (Arfona CEO Justin Marks)

“We are thrilled that we can now move past the rapid prototyping stage and directly into additive manufacturing for Valplast® appliances. Our knowledge of partial denture fabrication coupled with the most cutting edge technology is a slam dunk for labs who wish to go fully digital in their denture department.” (Peter Nagy, CEO of Valplast International Corp)

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Breaking News :Plaque HD®, produces statistically significant reductions in dental plaque

Breaking News :Plaque HD®, produces statistically significant reductions in dental plaque

plaquehd

The results released today from a randomized trial of a novel plaque identifying toothpaste, (Plaque HD®), show statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body. Inflammation throughout the body is accurately measured by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a sensitive marker for future heart attacks and strokes. These results, published today online ahead of print in the American Journal of Medicine, with an accompanying editorial by the editor-in-chief, show that Plaque HD®, produced statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and inflammation throughout the body as measured by hs-CRP.

In this trial, all randomized subjects were given the same brushing protocol and received a 60-day supply of toothpaste containing either Plaque HD® or an identical non-plaque identifying placebo toothpaste. To assess dental plaque, all subjects utilized a fluorescein mouth rinse, and intraoral photographs were taken under black light imaging. For hs-CRP, levels were measured by an independent laboratory using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

“While the findings on reducing dental plaque extend a previous observation, the findings on decreasing inflammation are new and novel,” said Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., senior author and first Sir Richard Doll Professor, and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University.

Plaque HD® is the first toothpaste that reveals plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing.

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Medical Emergencies Lecture – Dr. Malamed – A Must Watch

Porphyromonas gingivalis & Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans associated with increased of pancreatic cancer. – Study

Porphyromonas gingivalis & Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans  associated with  increased of pancreatic cancer. – Study

NEW ORLEANS: Research released Tuesday showed that two species of bacteria with impossibly long names, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were associated with a sharply increased risk of getting pancreatic cancer. The data showed that carrying both bacteria was linked to a 50 percent increased likelihood of contracting the cancer, said Jiyoung Ahn, associate director of population sciences at the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Bacteria

The data doesn’t show a cause-and-effect relationship between the bacteria and pancreatic cancer, but it is a first step “in understanding a potential new risk factor,” Ahn said. The research was released at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting here in the form of an abstract.

Ahn acknowledged that scientists don’t yet know the answer to the big question: If those bacteria are culprits, how, exactly, do they contribute to an increased likelihood of pancreatic cancer? “We don’t yet know how oral bacteria affect the pancreas,” she said.

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