Oral Cancer Day Awareness Programs Across World

The Australian Dental Association used the occasion of World Cancer Day earlier this week (4 February) to remind Australians to schedule regular check-ups with their dentist which should include a screening for oral cancer.

Oral cancer is a potentially fatal disease that can affect all ages, from young adults to the elderly. However, regularly visiting the dentist can increase your chance of early detection.

During a screening, the soft tissues in and around the mouth are visualised and palpated by a dentist to check for cancerous or precancerous lesions. It is one of the most important components of a general dental check-up and should be performed routinely.

Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, it is more frequent in men than women, and it usually appears at the age of 60.

Early detection is essential to manage this disease, and it is possible since the most common sites for oral cancer are very visible areas such as the tongue, the inside of the cheeks, and the floor of the mouth.

Therefore, to guide dental professionals and improve the prevention of this disease, the FDI World Dental Federation and SUNSTAR, a holistic healthcare company, have developed a chairside guide to prevent and treat Oral Cancer.

‘Oral cancer: Prevention and patient management.’

This toolkit for professionals focuses on the prevention and management of oral cancer patients, paying particular attention to the screening process.  (Source)

Meanwhile in India , The Indian Dental Association’s (IDA) Kolkata and the Suburban branch have started one month-long oral cancer awareness camps at 10 different places to impart knowledge on how to check oral cancer and other ailments. The IDA has already been observing ‘Oral Cancer Awareness Month’ which will continue till February 4. One of the main objectives of the programme is to ensure that people become aware on how to prevent various oral diseases. (Source)

 

Los Angeles dentist pleads guilty to health care fraud amounting to $3,853,931

A Los Angeles, CA-based dentist pleaded guilty on Thursday to a March 2018 indictment charging him with health care fraud arising from his false and fraudulent billings for crowns and fillings, which were never provided to patients.

Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, US Attorney Nicola T. Hanna of the Central District of California, Assistant Director in Charge Nancy McNamara of the FBI’s Washington, DC Field Office and Assistant Director in Charge Paul D. Delacourt of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office made the announcement.

Benjamin Rosenberg, DDS, 58, of Los Angeles, CA, pleaded guilty to one count of health care fraud before US District Judge John A. Kronstadt of the Central District of California. Sentencing will take place on May 23 before Judge Kronstadt.

As part of his guilty plea, Rosenberg admitted that he submitted and caused to be submitted approximately $3,853,931 in false and fraudulent claims to various insurance companies for dental care that Rosenberg knew had not been rendered. Rosenberg further admitted that he submitted these false and fraudulent claims to Metlife, Anthem, Cigna, Delta Dental, Guardian, LMCO-DHA, United Health, and United Concordia (the “carriers”), which caused the carriers to pay Rosenberg approximately $1,415,011.

Source

900 Saudi dentists are jobless ; 9,000 expat dentists work under MOH

More than 900 Saudi dentists remain unemployed while about 9,000 expatriate dentists work in hospitals under the Ministry of Health, according to the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCHS).

There are 5,287 Saudis and 9,729 expatriates who are licensed to practice general dentistry in the Kingdom.

Addressing the 20th batch of the commission’s graduates in Jeddah on Tuesday, Health Minister Tawfiq Al-Rabiah reiterated his ministry’s efforts to employ Saudi dentists.

The commission said there were 3,116 dental specialists, including 1,651 Saudis of whom nine were unable to find jobs.

According to the commission, there are 26 dentistry colleges in the Kingdom of which 18 are government-run and eight in the private sector. Each year they graduate between 2,000 and 3,000 dentists.

The commission said only 25 percent of the practicing dentists in the Kingdom were Saudis, adding that about 27.5 percent of the dentistry jobs will be Saudized each year. It said 21,800 jobs would be created for Saudi dentists by 2027.

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Align Technology celebrates six millionth Invisalign patient

Align Technology reaches six millionth Invisalign patient 

The company have announced that over six million patients have begun treatment with Invisalign, which include 1.4 million teenage patients.

The six millionth Invisalign patient, Yuzhe is a 12 year-old Chinese student who began treatment in October 2018 with Dr Jiawei Wo using Invisalign Comprehensive with mandibular advancement treatment.

Joe Hogan, Align Technology president and CEO said: ‘We are delighted to be celebrating another significant milestone with Invisalign trained doctors and their patients.

Align Technology founded by Zia Chishti &, Kelsey Wirth in the year 1997, is a manufacturer of 3D digital scanners and clear aligners used in orthodontics. It is headquartered in San Jose, California; it manufactures the aligners in Juarez, Mexico and its scanners in Israel.

Alliance for a Cavity-Free Future (ACFF) Awards Grants to Improve Oral Health of Young Children in Canada and the United States

The Canada-United States Chapter of the Alliance for a Cavity-Free Future (ACFF) has awarded four interprofessional grants totaling over $50,000.00 (USD) to fund projects that will have a positive impact on reducing the instance of dental caries, which is reversible, for children aged 0-6.  These projects will be carried out in 2019.

The grant program aims to bring together groups outside of dentistry, such as pediatrics and primary care, to help underserved communities. Made possible through funding from Colgate-Palmolive, the grants focus on populations with high caries needs and disadvantaged communities such as those with low incomes and or limited access to care.

Worldwide, 60–90% of school children and nearly 100% of adults have tooth decay.In fact, dental caries  is the most common, yet preventable, chronic disease on the planet. The impact of this disease has a profound impact on children in North America. In Canada, an estimated 2.26 million school days are missed each year due to dental related illness.  In the United States, a child is five times more likely to seek emergency room treatment for dental problems than for asthma, often because they can’t see a dentist, are uninsured or can’t afford routine dental care.

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More than 1 million patients unable to get NHS dentist in UK

More than a million people in England cannot register with an NHS dentist, with many “left in pain” and paying the price for ministers’ “indifference”, dental leaders warned.

Analysis of the NHS GP Patient Survey found one in four patients, roughly 1.03 million people, are not on the books of an NHS dentist and have been unable to get an appointment in the past year.

The British Dental Association (BDA) said the issue is set to get worse with three out of five dental practitioners in England saying they intend to reduce their NHS work, or stop entirely, in the next five years.

Britian’s high sugar habit has led to soaring numbers of tooth extractions, particularly in young children, where they have risen 50 per cent in the past two years.

Access issues exist in every English region, but Lincolnshire is the area worst hit, followed by parts of Norfolk, Derbyshire, West Yorkshire and Cornwall, according to the NHS data.

 

Source

Research between the Kornberg School of Dentistry and the College of Engineering uses stem cells to regrow the pulp-dentin complex

Associate Professor of Endodontology Maobin Yang, director of the Regenerative Health Research Laboratory at the Kornberg School of Dentistry, and Professor and Department Chair of Bioengineering Peter Lelkes have been collaborating on the research for three years. Yang and Lelkes’ work focuses on using dental stem cells to regenerate the  – pulp  and dentin, tissue.

In generating the tissue using stem cells, there’s one major problem. “When you put the components into the canal, they don’t have spatial control, so they don’t know where to grow the pulp and the dentin—the dentin outside and the pulp inside. So we need structure.”

That’s where Lelkes, a Laura H. Carnell Professor, came in: He worked with Yang to develop a bioengineered two-sided scaffolding to guide the tissue growth.

This is one of the great cases when he says, ‘Here, I have a clinical problem, let’s try to find an engineering solution to this problem.'”
— Peter Lelkes, Department Chair, Bioengineering

“The beauty of the system is that we have shown in vitro , that we can engineer a two-sided scaffold, and can guide the stem cells to differentiate into both pulp cells and dentin, producing odontoblasts that will eventually repair the root canal. We—our smart scaffold—can do this differentially with great efficacy.”

Yang and Lelkes’ partnership was born out of a friendship that occurred by happenstance: When Yang arrived at Temple six years ago, he initially worked out of a lab in Lelkes’ department and found a mentor and friend in Lelkes. So when he needed bioengineering assistance in his research, he turned to Lelkes.

“This is one of the great cases when he says, ‘Here, I have a clinical problem, let’s try to find an engineering solution to this problem,’” Lelkes said.

The pair recently published their findings in the journal Tissue Engineering.

Dr. Ritika Oberoi , A Dentist – Leading India’s First Formula LGB Ahura Car Racing Team

Six women, including  Dr. Ritika Oberoi‎, became part of history when they drove the Formula LGB cars at the Kari Motor Speedway over the weekend, just fortnight after they spotted an online post on a talent hunt conducted by former national champion Sarosh Hataria.

“It was after the Desert Storm my navigator motivated me to take up racing professionally. Being a passionate driver, having done all the forms including off-roading and rally, this was something which I was waiting for a long time,” Ritika told IANS.

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Forensic Odontology, IDA & Indian Defence

Very soon , Indian defence forces to have the odontologic database created by the forensic dentists.

The Indian Dental Association (IDA) is in talks with defence authorities to create a dental database of defence personnel that can be used for forensic analysis.Dr. Ashok Dhoble, honorary secretary general, IDA, quoted : , “The database will help in identifying bodies using dental forensics. The data will be handy during post-mortem examination.”

The idea was discussed at a conference of doctors on ‘Disaster victim identification’ on Friday. Dr. Emilio Nuzzolese from University of Catanzaro in Italy, who works closely with Interpol, shared his experience on the importance of forensic dental identification. Experts also said that dental analysis was much cheaper than DNA analysis.

This task may require many dentists. In an era in India when dentists are facing lesser job opportunities , this move by the IDA may lead to not only helping the defence forces, but also creating many jobs for the dental graduates.

Source

Equine Dentistry Existed 3000 Years Back – New Study

Horses had dentists more than 3000 years ago in Monoglia.

More than 3000 years in Mongolia , when a horse had tooth pain the herder would chop off the crown thereby relieving pain – such is the evidence found by  William Taylor, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. he first came across the strange sawn tooth in the collections of the National Museum of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar. According to the study, the findings are significant because it counteracts previous theories that veterinary care was a “western science” developed by civilizations in China or the Mediterranean — but instead by nomadic people centuries earlier. Horses drove civilizations and are considered responsible for today’s globalization to a large extant . Relief from tooth pain rather helped in this process to some extant.

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