Research between the Kornberg School of Dentistry and the College of Engineering uses stem cells to regrow the pulp-dentin complex

Associate Professor of Endodontology Maobin Yang, director of the Regenerative Health Research Laboratory at the Kornberg School of Dentistry, and Professor and Department Chair of Bioengineering Peter Lelkes have been collaborating on the research for three years. Yang and Lelkes’ work focuses on using dental stem cells to regenerate the  – pulp  and dentin, tissue.

In generating the tissue using stem cells, there’s one major problem. “When you put the components into the canal, they don’t have spatial control, so they don’t know where to grow the pulp and the dentin—the dentin outside and the pulp inside. So we need structure.”

That’s where Lelkes, a Laura H. Carnell Professor, came in: He worked with Yang to develop a bioengineered two-sided scaffolding to guide the tissue growth.

This is one of the great cases when he says, ‘Here, I have a clinical problem, let’s try to find an engineering solution to this problem.'”
— Peter Lelkes, Department Chair, Bioengineering

“The beauty of the system is that we have shown in vitro , that we can engineer a two-sided scaffold, and can guide the stem cells to differentiate into both pulp cells and dentin, producing odontoblasts that will eventually repair the root canal. We—our smart scaffold—can do this differentially with great efficacy.”

Yang and Lelkes’ partnership was born out of a friendship that occurred by happenstance: When Yang arrived at Temple six years ago, he initially worked out of a lab in Lelkes’ department and found a mentor and friend in Lelkes. So when he needed bioengineering assistance in his research, he turned to Lelkes.

“This is one of the great cases when he says, ‘Here, I have a clinical problem, let’s try to find an engineering solution to this problem,’” Lelkes said.

The pair recently published their findings in the journal Tissue Engineering.

Dr. Ritika Oberoi , A Dentist – Leading India’s First Formula LGB Ahura Car Racing Team

Six women, including  Dr. Ritika Oberoi‎, became part of history when they drove the Formula LGB cars at the Kari Motor Speedway over the weekend, just fortnight after they spotted an online post on a talent hunt conducted by former national champion Sarosh Hataria.

“It was after the Desert Storm my navigator motivated me to take up racing professionally. Being a passionate driver, having done all the forms including off-roading and rally, this was something which I was waiting for a long time,” Ritika told IANS.

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Forensic Odontology, IDA & Indian Defence

Very soon , Indian defence forces to have the odontologic database created by the forensic dentists.

The Indian Dental Association (IDA) is in talks with defence authorities to create a dental database of defence personnel that can be used for forensic analysis.Dr. Ashok Dhoble, honorary secretary general, IDA, quoted : , “The database will help in identifying bodies using dental forensics. The data will be handy during post-mortem examination.”

The idea was discussed at a conference of doctors on ‘Disaster victim identification’ on Friday. Dr. Emilio Nuzzolese from University of Catanzaro in Italy, who works closely with Interpol, shared his experience on the importance of forensic dental identification. Experts also said that dental analysis was much cheaper than DNA analysis.

This task may require many dentists. In an era in India when dentists are facing lesser job opportunities , this move by the IDA may lead to not only helping the defence forces, but also creating many jobs for the dental graduates.

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Equine Dentistry Existed 3000 Years Back – New Study

Horses had dentists more than 3000 years ago in Monoglia.

More than 3000 years in Mongolia , when a horse had tooth pain the herder would chop off the crown thereby relieving pain – such is the evidence found by  William Taylor, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. he first came across the strange sawn tooth in the collections of the National Museum of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar. According to the study, the findings are significant because it counteracts previous theories that veterinary care was a “western science” developed by civilizations in China or the Mediterranean — but instead by nomadic people centuries earlier. Horses drove civilizations and are considered responsible for today’s globalization to a large extant . Relief from tooth pain rather helped in this process to some extant.

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Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences (MAIDS) Ranked Number One For Seventh Consecutive Year

The Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences (MAIDS) under the Government of NCT of Delhi has been ranked the “Best Dental College in India” for the seventh year in a row. The evaluation was done on the basis of reports of independent rating agencies of Hansa Research, Drshti Strategic Research Services and Nielsen India. MAIDS under the leadership of Professor Mahesh Verma who is the  Director-Principal, MAIDS , outshone 310 dental colleges to become number one in dental education in India, as per the statement issued by the institute .

The MAIDS is the first and only dental hospital in India to be accredited by the National Accreditation of Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH), it said.MAIDS also has to its credit the development of India’s first indigenous implant system under the New Millennium Indian Technology Leadership Initiative- Dental Implant Project (NMITLI) in collaboration with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)